The Queen and I

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  1. In praise of Sue Townsend's The Queen And I
  2. In praise of Sue Townsend's The Queen And I | Den of Geek
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She has also been a noted and outspoken socialist for Americans: Essentially the book is about what would happen if a Marxist government took over and tossed the Queen and h This is a solid four-star comic book of that particular kind of dry British humour but more bouncy, because Sue Townsend of the The Adrian Mole Diaries series fame is bouncy. Essentially the book is about what would happen if a Marxist government took over and tossed the Queen and her fam out of Buckingham Palace and sent her to a sink estate to live on benefits. It's quite cleverly worked out and all the royal family stay in the characters we "know" them to be from the media.

Then she effing ruins it with an ending so crap that even Jodi Picoult, mistress of the cop-out ending, would be all agasp at such a cheap shot. If you aren't going to read the book, then this is the ending, view spoiler [ it's all a dream hide spoiler ]. Four stars demoted to three stars for that! View all 4 comments. Evicted by a new government, can the Royal family cope with life outside their palaces?

Sue Townsend's novel is read in eight parts by Miriam Margolyes - a performance which won her the award for Best Radio Actress of Now just Mrs Windsor, can the former monarch navigate a world with social workers and rowdy neighbours? Now plain Mrs Windsor, can the former Queen deal with a council estate crisis? And money is sho http: And money is short. Jan 23, Eddie Owens rated it liked it.

In praise of Sue Townsend's The Queen And I

This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This is a pleasant story with some funny lines. However, "The Prince and the Pauper" theme really needs both sides of the story to be complete. In this story, the royal family are forced to live on a council estate and of course hilarious hi-jinks then ensue. We really needed to see a family from the council estate taking on their royal lifestyles for comparison purposes.

QUEEN AND I TAGALOG VERSION COMPLETE

Sue Townsend obviously knows what an estate is like, but falls into the trap of making poor people "the salt of the earth", al This is a pleasant story with some funny lines. Sue Townsend obviously knows what an estate is like, but falls into the trap of making poor people "the salt of the earth", all ready to help the royals and each other. People are only on benefits because of the recession, and the system is against them etc.

Even the deadbeats and criminals on the estate aren't really bad people, in this story. Having grown up on council estates, I think that some poor people are lazy, incompetent, spiteful and unhelpful, just like better off people. That being said, poor people can be just as noble, self-sacrificing and friendly as anyone with more money.

There is no plot other than the displacement of the royals and this joke quickly wears a bit thin. All things considered, this should really have been a short story, because it didn't have the legs to be a novel. Oct 23, Caro M.

In praise of Sue Townsend's The Queen And I | Den of Geek

If you ever cared to take time to read British royal family gossip - and I think that it didn't matter you liked it or not, you still did, because it was everywhere - this book will be absolutely relevant to you. I'm a sucker for royal gossip and all my life, since I was teen, I've been checking magazines for some British "dirt". I know more about Windsors than about some of my actual neighbours. So it's pretty weird that I've read this book just now.

The premise is surreal and you can If you ever cared to take time to read British royal family gossip - and I think that it didn't matter you liked it or not, you still did, because it was everywhere - this book will be absolutely relevant to you. The premise is surreal and you can say author took a small revenge on royal family, especially on some if its members nobody ever likes Philip, eh?

And I think she deserves that. Cute, fun and light read, with quite unexpected ending. Imagine if the UK became a Republic and the Royal Family were sent to live on a housing estate and told to live like ordinary Britons. How would they cope? How would they adapt? This very scenario is explored in this rather funny little story by Sue Townsend. This was the first book that I have read by this author and it came highly recommended by a friend.

On the whole I found it a really enjoyable read. This was a very quick and easy book to read. The story unfolds at a good pace and the humor, Imagine if the UK became a Republic and the Royal Family were sent to live on a housing estate and told to live like ordinary Britons. The story unfolds at a good pace and the humor, which is undeniably British, really kept me wanting to turn the pages in order to see what would happen next and to which unsuspecting member of the Royal Family.

The depictions of each member of the Royal Family stay very true to how they are often portrayed in the press and on tv comedy shows and the results are pretty amusing. My two personal favourites were Prince Phillip and Prince Charles who owing to the year that the book was written is still married to Princess Diana. I can't say that I found this book laugh-out-loud funny all the way through because I didn't but I certainly had a big grin on my face whilst reading it and it did make me chuckle to myself on occasions.

The reason why this lost a star from me is because I found the ending to be somewhat weak and disappointing. I had suspected that it may turn out that way but I was really hoping that it wouldn't. The ending took some of the shine off what had been a really enjoyable read up to that point. If it had ended differently, I may well have given it a 5 star rating. To sum up, this was a really enjoyable book that kept me amused and held my interest throughout.

I would recommend it to anyone who is looking for a quick, easy read that doesn't take itself too seriously. The humor has a distinct British feel to it but don't let that put you off reading it. I think this is a book that anyone can enjoy, British or not. Jun 07, Elys rated it really liked it. Although this book is not aimed at children, I used extracts from it with adult language edited out!

Elizabeth gets a social worker, Phillip gets clinical depression, Cha Although this book is not aimed at children, I used extracts from it with adult language edited out! Elizabeth gets a social worker, Phillip gets clinical depression, Charles grows a ponytail and goes to prison, and Anne starts dating a carpet fitter called Spiggy. I wanted to use this book, partly as an antidote to all the ardently royalist activities that were organised for the week, and also to encourage critical thinking amongst the children about the concept of monarchy and social fairness.

We had some very interesting discussions about societal hierarchies as a result of reading this text! In terms of activities, the children diary entries as the Queen, and wrote a continuation of one of the extracts. Many of their efforts were really wonderfully written, and very funny. It was a very successful series of lessons, and good for the children many of them self-declared republicans to see an alternative and light-hearted view of monarchy being promoted in school. May 03, Sian rated it really liked it. I'd always intended to read more of Sue Townsend's works that weren't Adrian Mole ah, Adrian and I'm saddened that it was her death that reminded me of this and prompted me to pick this one up.

This is a great satire; bonkers in places and it's best to just go with the flow the way in which the republican government is elected, fr'instance, is daft because it is very very funny. I loved that it was Prince Phillip who just refused to get out of bed while all the others made a go of it, I loved I'd always intended to read more of Sue Townsend's works that weren't Adrian Mole ah, Adrian and I'm saddened that it was her death that reminded me of this and prompted me to pick this one up. I loved that it was Prince Phillip who just refused to get out of bed while all the others made a go of it, I loved the accents "could I possibly borrow an axe?

Parts of it were very sweet as well, there's a real sense of the community there. The ending is a bit mad, mind, but I'm not sure where else she could have gone with it! I'd love to see a modern day version with grown up Wills and Harry, and Kate. But who will write it now? Oh Sue, we miss you already! Velika sam obozavateljica genijalne Sue, u Adriana sam beznadezno zaljubljena pa si gustam kopati po njenim draguljima. Ova knjiga ima sve! Na momente sam se bas odvalila glasno smijati, a to moze samo ona i Pratchettic.

Znaci, republikanci dolaze na vlast, kraljevska obitelj mora abdicirati i smjestiti se u opcinske stanove s minimalnom kvadraturom i pokvarenim sustavom grijanja, a i socijalna sluzba im je stalno za vratom. I ne snalaze se niti s peglom, niti s otvaranjem konzervi, neki cak pad Velika sam obozavateljica genijalne Sue, u Adriana sam beznadezno zaljubljena pa si gustam kopati po njenim draguljima. I ne snalaze se niti s peglom, niti s otvaranjem konzervi, neki cak padaju u depre i zele umrijeti, neki odlaze u zatvor i sl.

Susjedstvo Kukuriku dolca je, kao i kraljevska obitelj iskarikirano na entu, ali pokazuju nevjerojatnu srcanost u tom cudnom suzivotu. Obozavam njezinu britkost, genijalnost, satiru i taj britanski humor. Preporuka svima koji gustaju u tom tipu humora. Bas je pametan odmor za dusu! I totalno mozes zamislit sve te face: Apr 15, BrokenTune rated it it was ok Shelves: Not sure where to start with this one.

The blurb on the back-cover looked quite an interesting premise: A socialist government wins the election and the Royal family are evicted to council housing, and told to get on without any staff or commodities. Apart from Harris, the corgie, all the family members are portrayed the same way as you would expect in the papers or a pretty lame impressions show, which makes the plot quite tepid and disappointing when comparing it to other caricatures such as G Not sure where to start with this one.

Apart from Harris, the corgie, all the family members are portrayed the same way as you would expect in the papers or a pretty lame impressions show, which makes the plot quite tepid and disappointing when comparing it to other caricatures such as Gin O'Clock. And, oh yes, the ending - just a tad predictable Terrific - if you liked her Adrian Mole books, then perhaps this one is for you!

Mir ist schleierhaft, wie man solche Vorteile nicht besser nutzen konnte. Nichtsdestotrotz sind einige Ideen sehr nett und haben mir leichte, seichte und somit angenehme Unterhaltung beschert, vor allem die politischen Implikationen am Ende des Buches mit dem Ausland sind eine gute Idee. View all 6 comments.

Aug 10, Clare O'Beara rated it it was amazing Shelves: This book posits that the Queen's nightmare comes true - a Republican party swoops to power in Britain, on the back of subliminal TV messages which incite the nation to do away with the monarchy. While the Royal family are not harmed, they are confined to a rundown housing estate with ordinary out of work neighbours and given a barely adequate dole.

The Queen is our central character and she is called the Queen all through, though her family are swiftly just Margaret, Anne, Charl Tremendous fun! The Queen is our central character and she is called the Queen all through, though her family are swiftly just Margaret, Anne, Charles etc.

Harry and William are, like a corgi, swiftly off behaving like young hooligans with the other hooligans. Anne befriends someone who asks to keep his horse in her garden, while Charles is delighted to do some gardening. Poor Philip becomes extremely depressed and the QM drifts off to a past world of memories. Our heroine the Queen has to learn how to open cans, feed her family and fit into a tiny council house, but we see her persevere and adapt, taking in her stride the full spread of life from births to death.

I had previously read Queen Camilla - the later follow-up - and now I'll have to go and read it again. While the books are obvious spoofs, the fun comes from the culture contrast and we get to know and like the new neighbours as much as we already think we know the Royals.

The story is splendid with a kind heart and a wry smile. Oct 27, Anne rated it really liked it. I know this book was published years ago, but somehow I just never got around to reading it until now. It is , a Republican Government has got into power in Britain and The Queen and her family are ordered out of Buckingham Palace and forced to move onto one of the worst council estates in the Midlands. This is such a funny read and although dated, it is still pretty relevant today - and shows the holes in our society.

There is no major plot line and to be honest not a lot does happen in the I know this book was published years ago, but somehow I just never got around to reading it until now. There is no major plot line and to be honest not a lot does happen in the book, but the observations of the Royals, the council estate dwellers and how they live together is fabulous. There are some really moving parts, some very funny parts and in places, it really makes you consider our society. Prince Charles is on the run, wearing a shell suit and sporting a pony tail. Princess Anne is riding up and down the council estate on a gypsy horse that she keeps in a bright pink stable, Prince Phillip is totally crackers and William and Harry are fully-fledged hoodies.

A really witty, clever and poignant read - ideal for a lazy Sunday afternoon. Mar 17, Shu cortesi rated it it was amazing. Whenever i want a laugh, i pick up this trusty book. For me the best of Sue Townsend. This may just be the best book I've read all year! I couldn't put it down. This was the first time I've read one of Townsend's book, that wasn't part of the Adrian Mole series. I think I preferred this. As we follow them through the ups and downs of trying to get to grips with life as commoners on a street named Hell Close it was 'Hellebore', but the letters fell off , they begin to feel like old friends, and the initial absurdity of the scenario is all but forgotten.

The Queen, as you might expect, is the main protagonist. The narrative is held together through her thoughts and actions, although we regularly cut away to peek into the other royal minds too. She remains in her position as the head of the family and the glue that holds them all together. She learns to make tea and perform household tasks, and she takes care of Prince Philip, who is bedridden with depression caused by the shock of Jack Barker's victory. Most crises are met with a stiff upper lip and a steely resolve. This stiff upper lip begins to relax itself as the Queen gets used to the idea of being able to show her emotions.

At one point she stands in her hallway and screams, just because it occurs to her that she's never screamed before. In another scene, she breaks down and cries over the Queen Mother's death, and is comforted by a retired carpenter she met outside a phone box. He's ecstatic with their new circumstances, as it now means he can have a quiet life and be left alone with his vegetable garden. Diana struggles to cope with life as a commoner and soon finds herself in a burgeoning relationship with Fitzroy Toussaint, a local accountant with designer shoes and a BMW.

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Charles doesn't mind or even notice this attraction, infatuated as he is with the Queen's next door neighbour, Beverley Threadgold. Under Beverley's influence, he gets a shell suit and a ponytail, and starts swearing. However, Charles' new life is interrupted when he finds himself accidentally arrested for incitement to riot, and subsequently sentenced to six months in prison.

When he has a chance to escape custody and go on the run, his most pressing concern in his farewell letter to the Queen is that she remembers him to Beverley, a foul mouthed chain smoker and obsessive Elvis fan. Princess Anne arrives in Hell Close a few days after the others.

If the Queen is the head of the family, Anne soon proves to be the backbone. Everything is dealt with swiftly and practically; Anne is even able to plumb her own washing machine in. She starts dating a carpet fitter named Spiggy, who admires Bob Hoskins and only deals in banknotes. The family get to know their neighbours, and more or less settle in to Hell Close.

Townsend's incredibly sympathetic portrayal of the Hell Close residents goes a long way to dispelling myths about the inhabitants of a typical council estate. It's true that no one on Hell Close has any money, and that they occasionally have to bend the rules to make ends meet, but they welcome the new family with open arms, immediately offering to help clean their cupboards out and give them tea making lessons.

The class barriers are gradually broken down as we witness the royals' opinions of their neighbours changing over time. That is, with the exception of Prince Philip. They can't talk properly. I'm frightened of them. As the royal family get on with the business of life as commoners, Jack Barker is slowly running out of money.

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His radical policies have emptied the country's coffers, and Britain is dangerously close to going bust. As a last ditch attempt to stop everything the country imploding, Barker agrees to a shared sovereignty deal with Japan, in exchange for an indefinite loan. He himself remains in charge as 'Governor General'.

In short, Barker sells Britain to the Japanese. There are countless subplots woven into The Queen And I — I've barely scratched the surface — and they all come together to leave you feeling like you've known the royal family for years. After reading this book, you might be confused next time you see them on TV and have to remind yourself that none of it really happened.. If The Queen And I is a satirical look at an alternate reality, its sequel, Queen Camilla , is perhaps more of a stark warning.


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Jack Barker and his newly renamed 'Cromwell Party' are still in power; only now his policies have plunged Britain into chaos. The public is constantly fluctuating between apathy and fear, having been subjected to years of scaremongering about everything from stepladders to going outside. To combat the pensions crisis, euthanasia has been legalised.